According to our research, there have been 139 reported anti-trans murders in the U.S. since 2017. The U.S. ranks third in the world for trans homicides, after Brazil and Mexico. The pervasive narrative surrounding trans people is about how many of us have died each year. But anti-trans violence isn’t just an interpersonal phenomenon.

Trans people are trapped in a web of violence. Institutions—like the government, agencies like ICE, the police—and individuals trap trans people into a life where we are vulnerable to homicide. Anti-trans homicides are not singular events. Murders are the result of multiple incidences over the course of a trans person’s life: every time we are refused healthcare, every time we are denied access to a homeless shelter, every time the police profile us as sex workers and incarcerate us.

Trans people aren’t killed because we’ve made the wrong choices in life. We’re killed because institutions and powerful individuals make the choice to put us at risk. Roxsana Hernandez died in the custody of Immigration and Customs Enforcement while living with HIV. Layleen Polanco died from a seizure while in solitary confinement at Rikers Island jail. Both deaths were preventable. We chose to feature four regions that are among those with the highest rates of violence in our study to illustrate the roots of anti-trans violence: Louisiana, Texas, New York, and Puerto Rico. Our study details the demographics of those who’ve been murdered. And we also dive deeper to explore the culture and legislation that put trans people at risk. To end anti-trans violence, we have to fix all the conditions that lead to the violence in the first place.

Despite overwhelming violence, trans people are brilliant, creative people. We’ve had to build our own families, homes, and health. Trans communities represent the possibility of a future of interdependence and mutual care among all people. You’ll find resources for trans people included in each region’s report.

The Roots of Anti-Violence: Louisiana is set against an orange background.

Louisiana

Between 2017-2020, advocates tracked 11 murders of trans and non-binary people in Louisiana. Take a deeper look into some of the issues facing TGNB Louisianans, learn about community-led solutions to end violence, and see how you can help.

The Roots of Anti-Violence: New York is set against a green background.

New York

Between 2017-2020, advocates tracked 9 murders of trans and non-binary people in New York State. Take a deeper look into some of the issues facing TGNB New Yorkers, learn about community-led solutions to end violence, and see how you can help.

The Roots of Anti-Violence: Puerto Rico is set against an yellow background.

Puerto Rico

In 2020, advocates tracked 6 murders of trans and non-binary people in Puerto Rico. Take a deeper look into some of the issues facing TGNB Puerto Ricans, learn about community-led solutions to end violence, and see how you can help.

Please note: Prior to 2020, Transgender Law Center did not track data about transgender and non-binary people killed in Puerto Rico.

The Roots of Anti-Violence: Texas is set against a brown background.

Texas

Between 2017-2020, advocates tracked 14 murders of trans and non-binary people in Texas. Take a deeper look into some of the issues facing TGNB Texans, learn about community-led solutions to end violence, and see how you can help.

Contact Us

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Transgender Law Center
PO Box 70976
Oakland, CA 94612-0976

For donations:
Transgender Law Center
P. O. Box 741803
Los Angeles, CA 90074-1803

Media Requests
EIN (tax identification number): 05-0544006

phone: 510.587.9696
collect line for people in prison and detention: 510.380.8229

Please note that our capacity to answer calls is unfortunately limited; we encourage people to call between 10am and 5pm Pacific time and/or write to us at the PO box above

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